Tough Times

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been experiencing situations where more and more people laugh at my stuttering. I’ve never really experienced this since for 9th and 10th grade I never really talked in school so not many people knew I stuttered ( I was very covert), and Junior year I was changed after taking the Successful Stuttering Management Program for 3 weeks and iIstarted to slowly put myself out there, but I did not experience anything like I would experience this year, my last year in high school. I’ve put myself out there a lot more, and since second semester began, I have had 4 new classes and I have had a lot more situations where people just laugh at me because of my stuttering, and of course judge me. I am a very strong person and I can most of it, because I am desensitized to this type of stuff, but if it keeps on happening and happening, it’s bound to affect me in some way. I noticed I’ve losing a little bit of confidence and this is something that hasn’t happened since I went to SSMP. I know what I must do. I must keep on putting myself out there, because I need to show these situations are not affecting me. One thing, I am not frustrated with, is my stuttering. No matter how long it takes me to say one word (and trust me sometimes it can be pretty long ). I have accepted myself as a stutter and living without worry about it. I’ve noticed that instead of me worrying about it, people worry about it for me. Don’t know how that works but it does somehow. Just the way I feel currently.

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4 Responses

  1. I have no idea if this is good advice for everyone…but what helped me in this regard (laughing people) is to learn to either laugh first or laugh with them. When you learn to laugh along with them at yourself…it dis-arms what they might have been trying to accomplish. It’s hard to make fun of someone about something that they already laugh at themselves about. If they *know* it gets to you…that only perpetuates the problem. For myself, this also gave me a greater sense of self esteem and it actually made some people admire my approach to my own problem. Being a teenager/in school with a stutter is difficult, I know. Hang in there!! 🙂

  2. Thanks for the advice Tony. I am usually friendly and joking sometimes about my stuttering with my friends because they understand. I was having one of those days I guess because I learned this quote which says “it is none of my business what other people think about me.” I guess I will try to care less and when people do laugh, I will try to show them I am not affected. Thanks!

  3. Wow, this is a great blog. It is very well done.

    Anyway, it shouldn’t be about “showing them,” it should be about being comfortable with yourself. Tell your teacher your situation and just sit until the blocks stop. That’s what I would do anyway.

    That way, you’re in control of the situation and students would understand what’s going on, and wouldn’t get nervous along with you.

  4. Chris, thanks for the advice also. I guess for me, my main challenge right now is time pressure. Going through the block and not hurrying up so other people don’t wait is something I shouldn’t try, because I need to show I am patient with myself. If people see I am in control and patient, maybe they will be more patient too.

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